Comments

Re: Please let's focus on filling the pipe (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Site Update on 2015-10-22 16:45 (#RA39)

Bryan did include some relevant ideas:

"automatically created stories generated from popular stream articles." And “share this page” buttons could both help fill the pipe more.

In addition, the pipe does act as a time-suck for me, too, so eliminating that would also help (unless you'd like to jump in). With any luck, readers will see how their direct involvement affects this site and might submit more. If nothing else, it can keep going with an even smaller base and no dedicated editor.

My submissions look a different recently, precisely because I've been submitting from my rss reader on my phone... The final step involves copying to clipboard then submitting via web browser, but it works. An email address for submissions could be nice (though somebody needs to fill in the category) but that last step doesn't take much time.

Re: I am not too surprised... all countries are relatively close to the equator (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Hunter gatherers with no access to technology still only sleep 6.5 hours a night on 2015-10-22 06:43 (#R6ZQ)

Body temperature is 99F, unless the weather is higher than that (which it isn't at NIGHT when people want to sleep), you dont need cooling for comfort.

It is modern society that has made mechanical cooling critical. If you dont live in a huge tight structure that has lots of thermal mass and which blocks airflow, it will cool off quickly at night. If you arent obese, your body will handle high temperatures quite well. If society doesnt frown on you runing around in nothing but a loin cloth, you'll be much more comfortable in much higher (nearing 99F) temperatures.

And even very primitive man knows it stays nice and cool in caves, moist and/or shaded locations, etc. A little shade and evaporative cooling is easy to manage.

Contradicts "segmented sleep" theories, too. (Score: 2, Interesting)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Hunter gatherers with no access to technology still only sleep 6.5 hours a night on 2015-10-21 19:43 (#R72P)

This research also seems to undermine the theories pushed by advocates of "segmented sleep", who claim natural sleep patterns involve no more than 4-hour blocks of sleep at a time... That's right, yet again the BBC lied to you:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16964783

Re: I am not too surprised... all countries are relatively close to the equator (Score: 3, Interesting)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Hunter gatherers with no access to technology still only sleep 6.5 hours a night on 2015-10-21 19:04 (#R6ZC)

Considering the hispanic username, I'd guess it's (most likely) just a cultural thing, with economic implications:

http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/12/30/the-behavioral-economics-of-mexican-central-heating/

A good read for anybody who has aa few minutes to spare.

Re: I am not too surprised... all countries are relatively close to the equator (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Hunter gatherers with no access to technology still only sleep 6.5 hours a night on 2015-10-20 22:15 (#R3R8)

Pre industrial societies have access to fire, too. It would be very easy for them to maintain warmer temperatures.

Re: Submitting is work (Score: 2, Informative)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Site Update on 2015-10-19 15:50 (#QZ12)

If there's something wrong with a submission, you can resubmit a better one easily enough, and vote-down the original. A wiki would be all kinds of extra complexity (ownership, 3RR, POV pushing, etc.) that isn't needed for something so ephemeral.

I've been operating the pipe as the first option describes, over the past few weeks... Submissions (even my own) sit there until they get to +3, then published to the front page. I haven't seen any problems, yet, though a threshold of +5 is probably more practical.

Re: Thank you Prime Minister (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Most Australian ISPs not ready to capture user data on 2015-10-17 16:25 (#QSP1)

I thought US Vice President Joe Biden's advice was far better:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv66RiFC4T0

Re: Facebook increasing tracking (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Should People Be Able to Demand That Websites 'Do Not Track' Them? on 2015-10-16 17:20 (#QPKC)

Actually, Gmail works best if you disable JavaScript...

See: http://pipedot.org/comment/2TPQ

Facebook increasing tracking (Score: 3, Interesting)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Should People Be Able to Demand That Websites 'Do Not Track' Them? on 2015-10-15 10:02 (#QJ0M)

This is a good article explaining how Facebook is becoming even more intrusive, and how it might be violating current laws:

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/10/internet-companies-confusing-consumers-profit

I'd say web browsers are to blame. They are built on the model of "trust everything", which is the source of so many problems. Popups and the blink tag are a thing of the past, because web browsers chose to eliminate them. They could just as easily eliminate most "web bugs" that allow user tracking and other annoyances. If privacy and security were primary considerations, instead of "Does this pixel show up EXACTLY where it was supposed to?" the web could be a far faster, safer, and more private place.

In the extreme case, imagine all web browsers only rendered basic HTML by default... If you want to accept cookies, load images, scripts, or 3rd party CSS on a given page, you just hit a toolbar button to do so, but otherwise you get the basic version (with placeholders) with no possibility of 3rd party tracking, no floating toolbars or overlay ads, no user-hostile scripts that disable right-clicking, etc. It would be slightly inonvenient for users, but has many advantages, and would be a strong incentive for sites to rely less on those web bugs.

Re: Mention the TPP? (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Four more carmakers join diesel emissions row on 2015-10-14 15:45 (#QFDX)

I don't see how TPP makes things any worse than the current DMCA ("TPP allows countries to create security exemptions").

Re: Could you use hydrogen for permanent-installation balloons? (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Aeroscraft shows off its giant airship on 2015-10-13 18:14 (#QC9W)

Actually, natural gas is cheap, highly buoyant, and not as escape prone as helium or hydrogen... Still highly flammable, and could be used to run the engines as well.

Re: Floppy disks more secure? (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Why the floppy disk is still used today on 2015-10-12 22:23 (#Q9BD)

Mylar seems strong, until it gets nicked... One tiny little puncture, and the tear will propagate wildly, basically shredding.

Even if you eliminated material strength concerns, it's still a huge step backwards. Hard to believe someone found some way to make 8" floppies sound like a technically superior and more convenient option...

Re: Flop-in replacement HW (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Why the floppy disk is still used today on 2015-10-12 10:34 (#Q7BK)

Various companies have made floppy drive emulators for quite a while.

http://www.floppydrive.eu/floppy-emudrive-wihout-case.html

Re: Floppy disks more secure? (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Why the floppy disk is still used today on 2015-10-11 17:44 (#Q5D3)

I wonder how magneto-optical media compare to 8" floppies.
Sony used-to warranty the data retention of their write-once M.O. media (for 25-years IIRC), and would pay for data recovery if they failed.

These days they say their MO discs are tested to last 50+ years:

http://www.sony.net/Products/Media/DataMedia/products/ProDiscDATA/index.html

They also claim 10,000 write/erase cycles and 1million reads for their rewritable MO discs, but don't expect 50-year storage for those.

Sounds good, I know, until you check on the pricing...

Re: Floppy disks more secure? (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Why the floppy disk is still used today on 2015-10-11 17:27 (#Q5CN)

Critical systems can also be completely isolated when thumb dives are used.
You should at least have said CDs/DVDs or other similar data-only media. Thumb drives are HORRIBLE for security. The protocol is extremely complex, perfect for innumerable types of exploitation.

A thumb drive could easily be an input device, keylogger, etc., instead of a dumb storage device:

http://www.thice.nl/hide-your-data-in-plain-sight-usb-hardware-hiding/

http://www.irongeek.com/i.php?page=security/programmable-hid-usb-keystroke-dongle

It could cause electrical damage to connected systems:

http://kukuruku.co/hub/diy/usb-killer

It can have bad firmware that causes subtle corruption:

http://www.wired.com/2014/10/code-published-for-unfixable-usb-attack/

etc.
Punch tapes should in theory have an unlimited capacity.
I don't want any life-critical systems to depend on proper and careful handling a fiddly roll of paper tape. Floppies are incredibly convenient and extremely durable by comparison to paper tape. And what about very high-humidity?
Do you really think that 1982 someone was able to anticipate Stuxnet?
No, it was a happy accident that not upgrading provided some benefits, but it is a benefit just the same.

Re: Floppy disks more secure? (Score: 2, Insightful)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Why the floppy disk is still used today on 2015-10-11 14:03 (#Q51C)

I assume they're talking about sneakernet, in general, being more secure than any kind of live data connection. The critical system can be completely isolated.

Punch-cards may have too-little capacity to be practical (otherwise, they could just write it out) and I know the card reader is much more elaborate and prone to mechanical failures than a floppy drive. EMP isnt likely a big concern, as they're already shielded and sheltered deep undeground.

And finally:

"The disks also have a built-in protection against portable-storage attacks like Stuxnet, which was introduced to Iran’s Natanz nuclear plant via a thumb drive, since the disks don’t have nearly enough space to hold such a sophisticated piece of malware."

Re: Capacity... (Score: 3, Funny)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Why the floppy disk is still used today on 2015-10-11 10:27 (#Q4KW)

Re: I don't get it (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'Privacy Is A Fundamental Human Right' on 2015-10-09 09:08 (#PYRZ)

I already included two links which explain iMessage flaws in detail. Any reason why you didn't read them the first time around?

Re: I don't get it (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'Privacy Is A Fundamental Human Right' on 2015-10-09 05:20 (#PY8M)

Well, they are trying to fix it -> http://www.gottabemobile.com/2015/02/17/how-to-secure-imessage-and-facetime/
No they aren't. You seem confused. The flaws have nothing to do with user passwords and 2-factor authentication. That's a whole other area where Apple is (or at least was) horribly, absurdly insecure.
It's not perfect, but at the moment I would say it beats the competition.
No, there are plenty of more secure options:

* http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/6981-secure-messaging-apps-business.html

Re: If I get 1 Euro for each time they announce an Earth's twin.... (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in NASA discover Earth's twin 1,400 light-years away on 2015-10-08 07:41 (#PTHF)

But you make it sound as if it has no arguments at all.
It has lots of speculation, based on no available information, and several paradoxically-contradictory theories. That is no argument. Hence my youtube link.

"Astronomers aren’t completely sure it’s a terrestrial planet" is the worst that can be said. Stretching that to claim it's a "mini-Neptune" is baseless, and also misleading. It's only a slim "possibility that it is actually a small gas planet".
And practically all agree, that 'twin Earth' is not very likely.
"It is the first potentially rocky super-Earth planet discovered orbiting within the habitable zone of a star very similar to the Sun." Nasa's science chief John Grunsfeld called the new world "Earth 2.0" and the "closest so far" to our home. And even the io9 article you cited, calls it "Earth's Near Twin" right in the title...

Here's a list of just a few of the more straight-forward self-contradictions found in the article:
"Models of what might happen on this planet indicates that it could be on the verge of experiencing a runaway greenhouse gas effect like that on Venus." ... Jenkins did add, however, that there’s no guarantee Kepler 542b has experienced, or will ever experience, a runaway greenhouse gas process.

a possible “water world”, but that’s assuming it even has water

a smaller mass core, between 0.5 and 1.5 times the mass of the Earth ... holds on to far less of the lighter gases, making it much more likely to develop an atmosphere suitable for life.* / exoplanets with masses two- to three-times that of Earth could give rise to “superhabitability” — a perfect storm of life-friendly factors that could make an exoplanet even more habitable than our own.

assuming that it is, in fact, habitable, it is possible that life has had significantly more time to evolve there

We’re not even sure if it’s rocky, let alone certain what its atmospheric and chemical composition is like.
* Not on-page, a linked-to io9 explanation of the theory.

Re: I don't get it (Score: 3, Interesting)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'Privacy Is A Fundamental Human Right' on 2015-10-08 06:14 (#PTJP)

I'd assume it's just "good for business"... Apple put-in encryption features AFTER the public outcry of the Snowden/NSA domestic spying revelations (Apple was well-aware, but there was no public outrage yet) and privacy-centric and/or non-US businesses were gaining customers at others expense.

Apple likes to loudly tout how iMessage is safe from spying & subpoenas, despite the fact that the key exchange is weak and easy to undermine:

* http://www.zdnet.com/article/hackers-heres-how-apples-imessage-surveillance-flaw-works-video/
* http://www.tomsguide.com/us/is-apple-imessage-secure%2Cnews-17741.html

Re: Yes, but (Score: 2, Insightful)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Hand dryers worse than paper towels for spreading germs on 2015-10-06 01:21 (#PJNX)

Depends on why you have bathroom doors in the first place. I've been in airports that eliminate the doors entirely, and just have a partition immediately inside the passageway, so nobody outside can see in. That seems like the best solution in general.

If you still want a door, it might be a small bathroom that needs to lock, or they're for blocking noise, odors, etc. In tight spaces they can be good barriers to keep high-traffic from incidentally pushing in. In any of those cases, automatic doors wouldn't work (and they'd be expensive additions). That is, unless the bathroom door goes directly outside, into the elements...

Re: There's a market here, not just ARIN (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in ARIN finally runs out of IPv4 addresses on 2015-10-05 08:09 (#PFWJ)

There's no more IPv4 addresses left to be pumped out of the ground. You may (or may not) be able to buy them from an organization that previously pumped a bunch out and doesn't happen to need them all, but there's no more new supply. Prices won't just rise, they'll dramatically spike, and it won't be long before that pool of last resort will be completely exhausted, too. There's too many people, too many devices. There big crunch is imminent.

Re: Dyson dryers (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Hand dryers worse than paper towels for spreading germs on 2015-10-03 13:33 (#PBJC)

Doesn't mention the new forced air Dyson dryers
Yes it does:

"both jet and warm air hand dryers"

The Dyson is just one model of the modern jet/turbo type hand dryers. The first (LONG before Dyson) was the Mitsubishi Jet Towel. Others include the Excel XLERATOR, American Dryer Extreme Air, World Dryer SLIMdri/SMARTdry/Airforce, BluStorm, Saniflow, ASI turbo, and more.

Personally, I HATE them all... The noise level is ridiculously ear-shattering, and even in low-traffic restrooms they leave wet trails across the wall and a puddle on the floor underneath them. Even at 3X the operating cost, I'd gladly go with warm air units.

Re: Any precedent for this sort of thing? (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in France rules Google must remove offending seach results worldwide on 2015-10-02 00:09 (#P6V0)

Actually, Google would have to pull out of the entire EU, not just France.

You should probably save your comments for when these stories get pushed to the front page. Here in the pipe, hardly anyone will see them. This is really for editing the story before publication... corrections, more/better links, etc.

Not sure when these will go live... I figured waiting for maybe 3 up-votes would be no big deal, but they've been sitting at +1 for days and days.

Re: If I get 1 Euro for each time they announce an Earth's twin.... (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in NASA discover Earth's twin 1,400 light-years away on 2015-10-01 13:17 (#P4Y4)

Not a great read... Over and over they speculate about this theory or that, then walk it back with "but that’s assuming" xyz...

See them keep repeat that pattern reminded me of something:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXOebOaBFV4

Re: A waste of money (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in BBC Russia wants to expand, but faces challenges on 2015-10-01 05:43 (#P3S0)

In 1945 the Germans fled westwards. In 2015 the Ukrainians flee eastwards. Is that too subtle for dullards?
It's an old Soviet-era propaganda move, to cause suffering, then offer to help those affected.

Back when they blockaded West Berlin, and saw the airlift starting to succeed, the Soviets offered supplies to any hungry West Berliners who went over and turned-in their ration cards.
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin_Blockade#Initial_responses

Apparently the Ukrainans are less cautious, less skeptical of the aid the Russian government is offering, than the Germans were.

Do we really need to compare the ample human rights in the UK against the murders of journalists in Russia?

Re: Looks... normal (Score: 2, Informative)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Taurinus X200 laptop now FSF-certified to respect your freedom on 2015-09-30 00:42 (#NZGS)

Stallman uses a Lemote Yeelong,
From your link: "Saturday January 23, 2010."

I would think it safe to assume he has upgraded to something more modern in the intervening 5.7 years span...

Yup, he sure has... Upgraded at least to a Thinkpad X60 from these guys since then.

Re: A step backwards (Score: 2, Interesting)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Taurinus X200 laptop now FSF-certified to respect your freedom on 2015-09-30 00:34 (#NZFM)

I think the overriding factor is that its all currently closed source, with chunks being supplied by 3rd party developers
A server BMC is really just an low-resource embedded ARM based computer, mounted on the motherboard. Obviously that's something pretty easy for a Linux image to do. In fact I distinctly remember reading about some group working on writing just such an open source BMC firmware, but I can't motivate myself to go try and look it up again.

You can't just replace any BMC firmware with your own image, as they are cryptographically signed like the rest of the server firmware, but if you're working with the OEM, there's no reason you couldn't have an open source BMC image, and maybe work around the need for signing by only allowing updates via a boot-time BIOS prompt, a physical jumper, or similar physical access requirement that wouldn't work as well with (remote) servers.

Re: Good to see coverage, but nothing really new (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Netflix claims you don’t really want offline video support on 2015-09-29 22:45 (#NZ8J)

How about just linking to the story like #M0VY (with all the comments), instead of directly to a single comment like #MBJ5 ?

Notifications include links to both for easy click-through.

A step backwards (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Taurinus X200 laptop now FSF-certified to respect your freedom on 2015-09-29 22:07 (#NZ6D)

Removing/disabling existing out-of-band management strikes me as a distinct step BACKWARDS. OoBM is extremely useful and convenient (and uncommon in consumer hardware). It's unfortunate that manufacturers don't put a high priority on the security of their OoBM firmware, so I understand the reason for the removal... but I'd still call it on-par with protecting your computer by completely disconnecting it from all networks. It'll be secure that way, but...

Re: There's a market here, not just ARIN (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in ARIN finally runs out of IPv4 addresses on 2015-09-29 19:57 (#NYTP)

There are more IPv4 addresses to be had, right now, but the point of the article is that they will run out pretty soon, too, and transition to IPv6 takes some time. Any big entities that haven't at least begun, are late, behind most others, and may run out of time.

Re: Good to see coverage, but nothing really new (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Netflix claims you don’t really want offline video support on 2015-09-29 19:51 (#NYTN)

Pipecode has always worked that way with direct links. You have to link the last/bottom comment to see the whole chain. It's the polar opposite of /code but it works.

Re: If I get 1 Euro for each time they announce an Earth's twin.... (Score: 2, Informative)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in NASA discover Earth's twin 1,400 light-years away on 2015-09-28 19:47 (#NV2V)

From WP: "It is the first potentially rocky super-Earth planet discovered orbiting within the habitable zone of a star very similar to the Sun."

Re: Major disruptor (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in An Ohio power company wants to reverse the deregulation it once fought for on 2015-09-26 21:13 (#NNH6)

The Ohio utility in the article obviously fought for deregulation, against government regulation. They want the benefits of both, and none of the downsides.

As for others, yes, there should be government guarantees of minimal profitability, but they should NOT be guaranteeing maximum profitability all the time. Residential PV isn't going to put any of them out of business, just make them less profitable, and they won't accept that. They want consistently high profits, no matter what. That's not the kind of guarantee they should be getting, on the backs of the poor who have no choice but to pay their utility bills.

US FTC also (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Google violating Russian antitrust regulations by bundling its services with Android on 2015-09-26 19:49 (#NNC5)

Updated article with recent news the US FTC is investigating Google as well.

Re: loud link (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Giant killer lizards walked together with aborigines during the ice age on 2015-09-26 18:37 (#NN8H)

I did say "mouse-over or long press". The later works great with Firefox mobile and some other mobile browsers.

Re: loud link (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Giant killer lizards walked together with aborigines during the ice age on 2015-09-25 22:14 (#NK5T)

The old site never showed domains in the articles, only in comments. Anyhow it's not very useful, as any browser shows the domain when you mouse-over or long press any link, and there are plenty of short url and redirection services that'll foil it.

Re: Inaccurate title: Happy birthday song was not copyrighted (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Happy Birthday Song Released to Public Domain on 2015-09-25 19:29 (#NJT5)

This submission was sitting in the Pipe for a couple days. That would have been the place to critique & suggest fixes for it (or even submit a better write-up).

Major disruptor (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in An Ohio power company wants to reverse the deregulation it once fought for on 2015-09-24 06:28 (#ND3Y)

While this one singles out cheap natural gas, power companies across the board are struggling with distributed solar. In political actions funded by the Koch brothers, they're coming up with every off-the-wall plan they can. Scare tactics about their death spiral, aimed at convincing regulatory agencies to allow them to stop net-metering, add an extra fee for solar-power-producing homes, or otherwise asking the government to guarantee them a fixed amount of revenue, even as they provide less and less power:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/utilities-sensing-threat-put-squeeze-on-booming-solar-roof-industry/2015/03/07/2d916f88-c1c9-11e4-ad5c-3b8ce89f1b89_story.html

http://midwestenergynews.com/2015/07/30/missouri-regulators-looking-into-decoupling-utility-revenues-and-profits/

http://www.npr.org/2015/01/03/374737086/utilities-fight-for-revenue-lost-to-solar-power

This mess looks to play out like Bank Bailout... Semi-governmental private corporations, who give the profits they make to their investors, yet can expect the government to protect them from any losses when things go the other way.

To their credit, state regulators have been overwhelmingly rejecting their proposals pretty universally thus far, and not allowing them to essentially print their own money.

There is some indication that the death sprial is a myth, and this will all just mean slightly lower profits than they've come to expect:

http://cleantechnica.com/2014/06/24/will-renewable-energy-cause-utility-death-spiral/

Re: Good to see coverage, but nothing really new (Score: 2, Informative)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Netflix claims you don’t really want offline video support on 2015-09-21 23:49 (#N59C)

There are a decent number of phones with microHDMI output.

Re: Good to see coverage, but nothing really new (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Netflix claims you don’t really want offline video support on 2015-09-14 00:57 (#MBJ5)

As our Internet connections get faster and faster, and data-caps go up, the question of offline playback is of ever-decreasing importance. This would've meant a lot more to me five years ago than now.
Ironically, 5 years ago you could still get an "Unlimited Data" plan from AT&T and Verizon... Today, you can't.
- http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/2013/05/05/pegoraro-unlimited-data-plans/2132895/

And it was only last year that Boost/Virgin quietly switched from unlimited data, to throttled after 2.5GB.
- http://www.phonearena.com/news/Report-Virgin-Mobile-and-Boost-Mobile-to-lower-throttled-data-speeds-starting-in-May_id54094

And T-Mobile just announced they're dropping their heaviest use customers from their unlimited plan.
- http://pipedot.org/K8AY

It seems that prices on mobile data are going UP, not down. That being the case, I've gone with the flow and downgraded to just 500MB and I stay well under that, thanks to wifi. I pay about 30% less, too.

Re: Story selection (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Why I Love Pipedot on 2015-09-12 13:59 (#M7Q0)

That looks pretty good, certainly a huge improvement. EXCEPT when I click "dismiss" I get an error message:
* "record not found - table [notification] id [1]"
Similar to the error when modding a comment as spam. Perhaps that's only from a direct comment link?

Now if you could just fix the problem of low readership. Maybe you could spring for an ad on /. telling them |. doesn't have such annoying ads. ;-)

Re: I don't understand (Score: 3, Funny)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Google’s driverless cars run into problems with human drivers on 2015-09-12 00:20 (#M6KS)

Driving a car usually has very little to do with steering
You must be a TERRIBLE driver...

Re: All recent posts by article and user (Score: 3, Informative)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Why I Love Pipedot on 2015-09-11 13:33 (#M4W1)

Not quite what you're asking for, but see:

http://pipedot.org/comment/

Also note the RSS "comment feed" link at the bottom of that page.

Needs complete rewrite (Score: 1)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Mozilla is asking for money on 2015-09-11 13:29 (#M4V1)

Pretty lousy write-up. Doesn't mention current revenue, fundraising targets, what they want to use the money for, etc. Vague statements like "swimming in money" are meaningless and best avoided.

Good sources for the story, with all this info, are available for anyone who looks:

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2859599/firefox-pleads-for-cash-with-in-browser-fundraiser.html

Re: Wrong (Score: 3, Insightful)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Grsecurity stops issuing public patches, citing trademark abuse on 2015-09-11 13:20 (#M4QM)

I'm saying they are wrong.
No, that's NOT what you said... You said they were talking about GPLv3, remember? Now that I've throughly discredited that claim, you choose to switch your claim around to something else entirely.

I provided multiple sources for the non-revocability of the GPL. You've provided NO SOURCES for your claim, just your own paranoid delusions based upon very little reading of the law, and an overabundance of willful ignorance.
If the FSF was to point out flaws or errors, such utterances could be used against them in court in a case
Then they would simply keep quiet on the issue. There's no benefit to them lying. Instead, they're saying it because case law backs them up.
So they keep their mouth shut
Except they didn't keep their mouth shut. They weighed-in and specifically said the GPL (v2) is not revocable.
Why do you think the GPL has gone through 3 revisions so far?
I already listed the reasons for GPLv3. Revocablity isn't one of them.
I really don't understand how you think you can argue with me from a position of ignorance
I don't understand how you think you can argue with the legal sources I've cited, from your position of extreme ignorance. No matter how many times I prove you completely and totally wrong on one issue or another, you just ignore it and twist your claims around next time around so you don't have to acknowledge your error, and just pretend you weren't making incorrect, crazy and unsupportable claims a few minutes earlier...

And look, here's yet another source that's right on-the-nose:

http://gplv3.fsf.org/comments/rt/readsay.html?filename=gplv3-draft-1&id=163

Re: I don't get it (Score: 3, Insightful)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Netflix claims you don’t really want offline video support on 2015-09-11 13:19 (#M4TN)

Actually, things have gone backwards in Android land. More and more smartphones are coming WITHOUT microsd card slots. In Android 2.x, a microsd card was necessary for everything. In Android 4.x, the internal storage masquerades as a microsd card, so it's all kinds of hell trying to use your actual microsd card to store apps, app data, and store new files there, the way it seamlessly worked in 2.x. Nothing pisses me off more than telling a program to backup it's setting to microsd card, then having to copy it from internal storage to the actual microsd card, and needing to do the reverse when restoring. Far too much, Android has been going backwards.

This seems to be a result of phone manufacturers wanting to charge through the nose for anyone who wants more than 8GB of internal storage... It's actually difficult to find phones with over 32GB of storage, and a bit difficult to find phones with microsd slots... All too often low-end phones have them (eg. Moto-E), while the more expensive high-end phones do NOT (Moto X), and have less storage space as a result. Meanwhile, a 32GB microsd card costs just $10, far less than the cost of buying a different model of phone with more internal storage space.

Re: Where did the comments go? (Score: 2, Interesting)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Grsecurity stops issuing public patches, citing trademark abuse on 2015-09-10 20:46 (#M2AP)

There's a bit of a difference between espousing legal theories, and flooding the comments with page after page of irrelevant and/or redundant ranting and raving. That, the occasional bouts of tourettes, and the threats of personal violence, weren't too good either.

Anyone so inclined can change their preferences to show ALL hidden spam comments, but it's a mess.

The incorrect comment count due to entries threads being hidden when the top comments is flagged as spam, has already been reported as a bug number 62.

Re: Wrong (Score: 2, Informative)

by evilviper@pipedot.org in Grsecurity stops issuing public patches, citing trademark abuse on 2015-09-10 20:38 (#M2M2)

The GPL's own website talks about the current version, v3
Nope. Here's the archived page from back in 2001, before anybody started working on GPLv3:

https://web.archive.org/web/20011214143230/http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html#CanDeveloperThirdParty
The GPL's own website has a vested interest in promoting the GPL.
They have a vested interest in spreading accurate information about the GPL.
The GPL's own website is not trained in the law.
Are you seriously claiming the FSF and GNU organization don't have ANY LAWYERS working for them? Several of their high-ranking board members are working lawyers.
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